Social Psychology  

Prof. Dr. Immo Fritsche

 


Academic career

 

2011–present

Professor of Social Psychology at Leipzig University

2011

Heisenberg Scholarship (awarded by the German Research Foundation)

2009

Habilitation (University of Jena; Threat and Intergroup Behavior)

2003–11

Assistant Professor at the University of Jena (Social Psychology Group)

1999–2003

Research Associate at the University of Magdeburg (Social and Environmental Psychology Group)

2002

PhD (University of Magdeburg; Neutralization of environmentally harmful behavior)

1992–98

Graduate and postgraduate studies in psychology (degree: Diplom-Psychologe) at the University of Potsdam


 

Research interests

 
  • Intergroup and intragroup processes (e.g., social influence, collective action, intergroup conflict)
  • Motivated social cognition (e.g., basic psychological needs, social psychological reactions to threat, coping with human mortality)
  • Social psychology of the global environmental crisis (e.g., pro-environmental action, responses to environmental threat)


Selected publications


http://www.biphaps.uni-leipzig.de/fileadmin/user_upload/ag-sozpsy/Bilder/pdf-Symbol.ico Full list of publications

 

Fritsche, I., Barth, M., Jugert, P., Masson, T., & Reese, G. (2018). A social identity model of pro-environmental action (SIMPEA). Psychological Review, 125, 245-269.

Hoppe, A., Fritsche, I., & Koranyi, N. (2018). Romantic love vs. reproduction opportunities: Disentangling the contributions of different anxiety buffers under conditions of existential threat. European Journal of Social Psychology, 48, 269-248.

Fritsche, I., & Jugert, P. (2017). The consequences of economic threat for motivated social cognition and action. Current Opinion in Psychology, 18, 31-36.

Stollberg, J., Fritsche, I., & Jonas, E. (2017). The groupy shift: Conformity to liberal ingroup norms as a group-based response to threatened personal control. Social cognition, 35, 374-394.

Fritsche, I., Moya, M., Bukowski, M., Jugert, P., de Lemus, S., Decker, O., Valor-Segura, I., & Navarro-Carrillo, G. (2017). The great depression and group-based control: Converting personal helplessness into collective responses. Journal of Social Issues, 73, 117-137.

Barth, M., Jugert, P., & Fritsche, I. (2016). Still underdetected: Social norms and collective efficacy predict the acceptance of electric vehicles in Germany. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 37, 64-77.

Jonas, E., McGregor, I., Klackl, J., Agroskin, D., Fritsche, I., Holbrook, C., Nash, K., Proulx, T., & Quirin, M. (2014). Threat and defense: From anxiety to approach. In J. M. Olson & M. P. Zanna (Eds.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology (Vol. 49, pp.219-286). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.

Jonas, E., & Fritsche, I. (2013). Destined to die but not to wage war: How existential threat can contribute to escalation or de-escalation of violent intergroup conflict. American Psychologist, 68, 543-558.

Fritsche, I., Jonas, E., Ablasser, C., Beyer, M., Kuban, J., Manger, A.-M., & Schultz, M.  (2013). The power of we: Evidence for group-based control restoration. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49, 19-32.

Fritsche, I., Cohrs, C., Kessler, T., & Bauer, J. (2012). Global warming is breeding social conflict: The subtle impact of climate change threat on authoritarian tendencies. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 32, 1-10.

Fritsche, I., Jonas, E., & Kessler, T. (2011). Collective reactions to threat: Implications for intergroup conflict and solving societal crises. Social Issues and Policy Review, 5, 101-136.

Fritsche, I., Jonas, E., & Fankhänel, T. (2008). The role of control motivation in mortality salience effects on ingroup support and defense. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95, 524-541.


last update: 03.07.2018 

Contact

Prof. Dr. habil. Immo Fritsche

Leipzig University
Institute of Psychology
Department of Social Psychology
Neumarkt 9–19
04109 Leipzig
Germany

immo.fritsche(at)uni-leipzig.de

http://www.biphaps.uni-leipzig.de/fileadmin/user_upload/ag-sozpsy/Bilder/orangenes_phone.png +49 (0) 341 97 359 64

Office hours

Tuesdays, 11:00–12:00 am
(during lecture period)

Room: 2054